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Contents


Selected Library of Congress Subject Headings




Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective by George E. Belch and Michael A. Belch
Reserve HF5823 .B387 2009  Check Availability
Image:Advertising-and-promotion.jpg From the publisher:
Belch/Belch 8th edition is the first book to reflect the shift from the conventional methods of advertising to the more widely recognized approach of implementing an integrated marketing communications strategy. The text underscores the importance of recognizing that a firm must use all promotional tools available to convey a unified message to the consumer. The integrated marketing communications perspective (the theme of the text) catapults the reader into the business practices of the 21st century.
Marketing: Real People, Real Choices by Michael R. Solomon, Greg W. Marshall, and Elnora W. Stuart
Reserve HF5415.35 .S65 2009  Check Availability
Image:Marketing-Real-People,-Real-Choices.jpg From the publisher:
Marketing: Real People, Real Choices is the only text to introduce marketing from the perspective of real people who make real marketing decisions at leading companies everyday. The new edition is updated to reflect new marketing strategies companies are using to reach today’s increasingly savvy consumers.


Record Label Marketing by Thomas W. Hutchison, Amy Macy, and Paul Allen Focal Press, c2010.
Reference ML3790 .H985 2010  Check Availability
Image:Record-Label-Marketing.jpg From the publisher:
Record Label Marketing offers a comprehensive look at the inner workings of record labels, showing how the record labels connect commercial music with consumers. In the current climate of selling music through both traditional channels and new media, authors Tom Hutchison, Paul Allen and Amy Macy carefully explain the components of the contemporary record label's marketing plan and how it is executed. This new edition is clearly illustrated throughout with figures, tables, graphs, and glossaries, and includes a valuable overview of the music industry.
Start & Run Your Own Record Label: Winning Marketing Strategies for Today's Music Industry by Daylle Deanna Schwartz
ML3790 .S39 2009  Check Availability
Image:Start-&-Run-Your-Own-Record-Label-Winning-Marketing.jpg From the publisher:
For everyone interested in starting a record label to market new talent or to release and promote their own music, there has never been a better time to do it! Music can be released, distributed, and promoted for a fraction of traditional costs. Veteran author and music-business consultant Daylle Deanna Schwartz (who started and ran her own label) has rewritten and expanded her classic, Start & Run Your Own Record Label, to reflect industry changes and new opportunities for marketing music in today's climate. Start & Run Your Own Record Label is a comprehensive guidebook to building a record label, packed with how-to information about market trends and revenue streams for music releases.


This Business of Global Music Marketing by Tad Lathrop
ML3790 .L37 G56 2007  Check Availability
Image:Global-music-marketing.jpg From the publisher:
Think BIG capture the global music market. Worldwide tours, internet downloads, international album distribution-the global market for music is expanding with lightning speed, and that means big opportunities for everyone in the music business. The main obstacle? Lack of knowledge. The world market is packed with opportunity, but it's also full of cultural, regulatory, administrative, legal, political, and logistical pitfalls. This Business of Global Music Marketing offers a map of the world, with full information on how to break into the global market, how to distribute records abroad, how to find an audience, how to package records to appeal to local markets, how to establish partnerships with foreign businesses, how to deal with different rules of trade, and much more.
Rock Brands: Selling Sound in a Media Saturated Culture edited by Elizabeth Barfoot Christian
EBSCO ElectronicBook  Check Availability
Image:Rock-brands.jpg From the publisher:
In the first part of Rock Brands, the authors examine how established mainstream artists/bands are continuing to market themselves in an ever-changing technological world, and how bands can use integrated marketing communication to effectively “brand” themselves. In the second section, the authors explore how some musicians effectively use attention-grabbing issues such as politics and religion in their lyrics, and also how imagery is utilized by artists such as Marilyn Manson to gain a fan base. Finally, the book will explore specific changes in the media available to market music today and, similarly, how these resources can benefit music icons even after they are long gone.

Videos

Money for Nothing: Behind the Bu$ine$$ of Pop Mu$ic produced by Kembrew McLeod
Reserve DVD 626  Check Availability
Image:Money-for-nothing.jpg From the publisher:
Of all mass cultural forms, popular music has historically been characterized by the greatest independence for artists and allowing access to a broader diversity of voices. However, in the contemporary period, this independence is being threatened by a shrinking number of record companies, the centralization of radio ownership and playlists, and the increasing integration of popular music into the broader advertising and commercial aspects of the market. Money for Nothing succinctly explains how popular music is produced and marketed, and offers an accessible critique of the current state of popular music.
Before the Music Dies directed by Andrew Shapter
Reserve DVD 2637  Check Availability
Image:Before-the-Music-Dies.jpg From the publisher:
Never has the grass-roots American music scene been more diverse, or the broadcast and sale of music controlled by so few corporations. Filmmakers Andrew Shapter and Joel Rasmussen traveled the country to find out why, in the midst of so rich a tradition, mainstream music seems so packaged and repetitive, and what the future of American music may be.