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Walworth, D.D. (2009).

Article Number: IMT1
Author: Walworth, Darcy D
Title: Effects of Developmental Music Groups for Parents and Premature or Typical Infants Under Two Years on Parental Responsiveness and Infant Social Development
Reference: Journal of Music Therapy 46:1 (Spring 2009) p.32-52
Abstract: A study is presented that examined the effect of music therapy intervention on premature infants' and full-term infants' developmental responses and parents' responsiveness. Subjects were parent-infant dyads who attended developmental music groups or a control condition assessing responsiveness during toy play. Observations were coded with the number of seconds spent in each behavior using the SCRIBE observation program. Parents completed a questionnaire on the perception of their infant's general development, interpretations of their child's needs, the purpose of using music with their child, and their child's response to music. The infants attending the developmental music groups with their parents demonstrated significantly more social toy play during the standardized parent-infant toy play than infants who did not attend the music groups.
Document type: Research and Analysis
Special Features: Tables, Graphs, References
Broad subject: Music and Other Disciplines
Topics: Music Therapy; Infants; Statistical Analysis; Comparative Analysis; Social Interactionism; Autism
Publisher: American Music Therapy Association
ISSN: 0022-2917
ProQuest Document ID: 1096807
Document URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1096807?accountid=8581
Last updated: 2010-09-23
Database: International Index to Music Periodicals Full Text

Volkova, A., Trehube, S.E., & Shellenberg, E.G. (2006).

Article Number: IMT2
Authors: Volkova A; Trehub SE; Schellenberg EG
Title: Infants' Memory for Musical Performances
Reference: Developmental Science [Dev Sci] 2006 Nov; Vol. 9 (6), pp. 583-9.
Publication Type: Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Journal Information: Country of Publication: England
ISSN: 1363-755X (Print)
Linking ISSN: 1363755X NLM ISO
Terms: Child Development, Child Psychology, Memory, Mental Recall,Music, Pitch Perception, Humans; Infant; Retention (Psychology)
Abstract: We evaluated 6- and 7-month-olds' preference and memory for expressive recordings of sung lullabies. In Experiment 1, both age groups preferred lower-pitched to higher-pitched renditions of unfamiliar lullabies. In Experiment 2, infants were tested after 2 weeks of daily exposure to a lullaby at one pitch level. Seven-month-olds listened significantly longer to the lullaby at a novel pitch level than at the original pitch level. Six-month-olds showed no preference but their low-pitch preference was eliminated. We conclude that infants' memory for musical performances is enhanced by the ecological validity of the materials. Moreover, infants' pitch preferences are influenced by their previous exposure and by the nature of the music.
Full Text URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mnh&AN=17059455&site=ehost-live
Database: MEDLINE with Full Text

Keith, D. R., Russell, K. & Weaver, B. (2009).

Article Number: IMT3
Author: Keith, Douglas R; Russell, Kendra; Weaver, Barbara
Title: The Effects of Music Listening on Inconsolable Crying in Premature Infants
Reference: Journal of Music Therapy 46:3 (Fall 2009) p.191-203
Abstract: A study is presented that explored the effects of music therapy on the crying behaviors of critically ill infants classified as inconsolable. Twenty-four premature infants with gestational age 32-40 weeks received a developmentally appropriate music listening intervention, alternating with days on which on intervention was provided. The results revealed a significant reduction in the frequency and duration of episodes of inconsolable crying as a result of the music intervention, as well as improved physiological measures, including heart rate, respiration rate, oxygen saturation, and mean arterial pressure. The results suggest the viability of using recorded music in the absence of a music therapist or the maternal voice to console infants when standard nursing interventions are not effective.
Document type: Research and Analysis
Special Features: Tables, References
Broad subject: Music and Other Disciplines
Topics: Crying; Music Therapy; Testing; Medical Disorders; Statistical Analysis; Physiological Effects; Infants
Publisher: American Music Therapy Association
ISSN: 0022-2917
ProQuest Document ID: 1101276
Full Text URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1101276?accountid=8581
Last updated: 2010-09-23
Database: International Index to Music Periodicals Full Text