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10. Blindness & Low Vision and Music Therapy

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Darrow, A.-A., & Novak, J. (2007).

Article Number: BLV1
Author: Darrow, Alice-Ann; Novak, Julie
Title: The Effect of Vision and Hearing Loss on Listeners' Perception of Referential Meaning in Music
Reference: Journal of Music Therapy 44:1 (Spring 2007) p.57-73
Abstract: The effect of vision and hearing loss on listeners' perception of referential meaning in music is examined. After listening to six 37-second excerpts, participants with typical hearing and vision agreed with the composer's intended meaning significantly more often than did participants with vision or hearing loss. Selected images were more easily identified, or were more difficult to identify across conditions. Participant responses were not random, indicating that some referential meaning in music is conventional.
Document type: Research and Analysis
Special Features: Tables, Graphs, References
Broad subject: Music and Other Disciplines
Topics: Music Perception; Musical Meaning; Blindness; Deafness; Statistical Analysis; Listeners
Publisher: American Music Therapy Association
ISSN: 0022-2917
ProQuest Document ID: 1101004
Full Text URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1101004?accountid=8581
Last updated: 2010-09-23
Database: International Index to Music Periodicals Full Text

Flowers, P. J., & Wang, C.-H. (2002).

Article Number: BLV2
Author: Flowers, Patricia J; Wang, Chao-hui
Title: Matching Verbal Description to Music Excerpt: The Use of Language by Blind and Sighted Children
Reference: Journal of Research in Music Education 50:3 (Fall 2002) p.202-214
Abstract: A study is presented in which 41 sighted and 17 blind children listened individually to six short music excerpts and described them orally. Each child's descriptions were recorded, transcribed, and randomly ordered. Then, a panel of 10 music teachers attempted to assign each description to its intended excerpt. Teachers were able to match description to excerpt with about the same degree of accuracy for blind and sighted children. Descriptions were more easily matched at successive grade levels. Analysis of types of language used showed that sighted children remained consistent in number of musical elements described across age groups; however, blind students increased substantially in their descriptions of musical elements at each successive grade level. Sighted children used significantly more metaphors and emotional descriptors than did blind children. The use of temporal language increased with age, particularly among the blind students. Tables and references are included.
Document type: Research and Analysis
Broad subject: Music Education
Topics: Listening Tests; Blindness; Children; Research; Musical Works; Excerpts; Statistical Analysis
Publisher: MENC: National Association for Music Education
ISSN: 0022-4294
ProQuest Document ID: 1093451
Document URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1093451?accountid=8581
Last updated: 2010-09-23
Database: International Index to Music Periodicals Full Text

Robb, S.(2003).

Article Number: BLV3
Author: Robb, Sheri L
Title: Music Interventions and Group Participation Skills of Preschoolers with Visual Impairments: Raising Questions About Music, Arousal, and Attention
Reference: Journal of Music Therapy 40:4 (Winter 2003) p.266-282
Abstract: A pilot study is presented that had a two-fold purpose: to document and compare attentive behavior during music and play-based group instructional sessions; and to document and compare four group participation behaviors during music and play-based sessions. The four group participation behaviors included facing a central speaker, following one-step directions, manipulating objects according to their function, and remaining seated. Study participants were between the ages of four and six years inclusively. The children participated in four 30-minute instructional sessions - two were music-based and two were play-based. Each session was videotaped to collect behavioral data. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that attentive behavior was significantly higher during music-based sessions. Mean scores for the remaining group participation behaviors were higher in the music condition, but these differences were not statistically significant.
Document type: Research and Analysis
Broad subject: Music Education
Topics: Preschool Children; Visual Skills; Behavior; Music Instruction; Statistical Analysis; Music Therapy
Publisher: American Music Therapy Association
ISSN: 0022-2917
ProQuest Document ID: 1096667
Document URL: http://catalog.berklee.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1096667?accountid=8581
Last updated 2010-09-23
Database: International Index to Music Periodicals Full Text